A project of the Galen Institute

Issue: "Liberty & Limited Government"

New York Times: 14% Is Good Enough To Call Obamacare A Success

Merrill Matthews
Forbes
Thu, 2014-10-30
"Most of us have long realized that the New York Times’ standards are low. Just look at who the Gray Lady endorses for president and other high political offices. But even we were a little surprised at what little it takes for the editors to call Obamacare a success. The Times poses the question “Is the Affordable Care Act Working?” Given all the ACA’s problems, one could be forgiven for thinking it was a rhetorical question. It wasn’t. The paper asserts, “After a year fully in place, the Affordable Care Act has largely succeeded in delivering on President Obama’s main promises, an analysis by a team of reporters and data researchers shows.”"

Obamacare brings Democrats backlash, not benefits

Sarah Wheaton
Politico
Thu, 2014-10-30
"Most Americans don’t want to get rid of Obamacare. They just don’t share its fundamental goal of universal coverage anymore. And not only did the political benefits that Democrats thought the 2010 law would eventually bring them not materialize, opposition has only grown, according to an analysis of multiple polls taken between 2010 and last month. “There have been backlashes, but never like this,” said Robert Blendon, a professor at the Harvard School of Public Health and co-author of the analysis released Wednesday by the New England Journal of Medicine."

McConnell: Obamacare repeal not happening anytime soon

Niels Lesniewski, St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Thu, 2014-10-30
"Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell says Republicans won’t be able to repeal Obamacare anytime soon. Tempering the expectations of conservatives a week before the elections that could install him as the first Republican majority leader in eight years, the Kentucky Republican said in a Fox News interview Tuesday that a repeal of the health care law simply wasn’t in the cards for now."

Why Obamacare still matters in this election

Jason Millman
Washington Post
Thu, 2014-10-30
"Although the politics of Obamacare have cooled down this year — and even with declining interest in this year's midterms — the upcoming election will have a bigger influence on the direction of health care than you may think. That's the major takeaway from a new Harvard University analysis of 27 public opinion polls from 14 organizations on President Obama's signature law. The analysis, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, offers a pretty comprehensive view of how the Affordable Care Act — less than a year into its major coverage expansion — will shape the agenda for the next Congress and potentially the 2016 presidential race."

Landrieu sticks to support for Obama's health law

Melinda Deslatte, Associated Press
Wed, 2014-10-29
"BATON ROUGE, La. — U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu has doubled down on her support for the federal health care law even as polls show the revamp remains unpopular in Louisiana and a new Republican attack ad launched Tuesday hits the Democratic incumbent again for her vote. The 30-second TV commercial by national conservative group Crossroads GPS, co-founded by GOP operative Karl Rove, says Landrieu's vote for President Barack Obama's signature initiative was a betrayal of Louisiana."

Conservatives ready to give leaders hell

Lauren French and Anna Palmer
Politico
Wed, 2014-10-29
"Conservatives in Congress are drawing up their wish list for a Republican Senate, including “pure” bills, like a full repeal of Obamacare, border security and approval of the Keystone XL pipeline — unlikely to win over many Democrats and sure to torment GOP leaders looking to prove they can govern. Interviews with more than a dozen conservative lawmakers and senior aides found a consensus among the right wing of the Republican Party: If Republicans take the Senate, they want to push an agenda they believe was hamstrung by the Democratic-controlled chamber, even if their bills end up getting vetoed by President Barack Obama."

US sues NYC over Medicaid claims worth millions

The Associated Press
Wed, 2014-10-29
"NEW YORK — The federal government has sued New York City, saying it ripped off Medicaid for millions of dollars by submitting tens of thousands of false claims. A civil lawsuit seeking unspecified damages was filed Monday in Manhattan federal court. The lawsuit says the city and a computer company used computer programs to dodge a requirement that Medicaid be billed only after private insurance coverage is exhausted. The lawsuit says false diagnosis codes were submitted to Medicaid."

Speculation swirls around what happens if federal subsidies go away

Lisa Schnecker, Modern Health Care
Wed, 2014-10-29
"New language in contracts between the CMS and insurers operating on HealthCare.gov is grabbing attention, with some calling it an admission by the government that it might lose upcoming court battles dealing with insurance subsidies on the health portal and others saying the new wording is just a practical precaution. The new language appears to allow insurers to stop offering their plans should federal premium subsidies disappear. A number of cases regarding the legality of the subsidies in states without their own exchanges are now working their way through the courts. The language says, “CMS acknowledges that (the insurer) has developed its products for the (federal exchange) based on the assumption that (advance payments of the premium tax credit) and (cost-sharing reductions) will be available to qualifying enrollees.

Who Says Obamacare Isn't A Major Factor in Midterms

Byron York
Townhall
Wed, 2014-10-29
"Some Democrats and their advocates in the press believe Obamacare, a year into implementation, is no longer much of a factor in the midterm elections. But no one has told Republican candidates, who are still pounding away at the Affordable Care Act on the stump. And no one has told voters, especially those in states with closely contested Senate races, who regularly place it among the top issues of the campaign. In Arkansas, Republican challenger Tom Cotton is pulling ahead of incumbent Democratic Sen. Mark Pryor partly on the strength of a relentless focus on Obamacare. Cotton's newest ad attacks Pryor over the law, as did two of Cotton's four previous ads."

Obamacare remains top issue in Georgia insurance commissioner’s race

By Nicholas Fouriezos, Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Mon, 2014-10-27
"As Georgia’s insurance commissioner, Republican Ralph Hudgens rarely hesitated to voice his criticism of the health care law known as Obamacare. The incumbent continued that mantra Sunday even while caught in a political crossfire from his two lesser-known opponents. “I’ve said it’s going to limit choices, limit the number of doctors, and that premiums are going to increase,” Hudgens said Sunday at an Atlanta Press Club debate. “Those statements have been well legitimized by what has happened.” But some of his other statements put a bulls-eye on Hudgens."

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